Since its inception in June of 2013, the PC Music label has divided listeners and critics alike. In the beginning, they were the up and coming favorite of most indie music publications, but as the think-pieces came and went, they seemed to fall out of favor. It’s an odd shift considering the label has snowballed in the same direction ever since the first release. Through strategic partnerships with DISmagazine, Rinse FM,


For a melancholic mood, I’ve been listening repeatedly to this achingly beautiful piece, “Maasai.” This is the debut single from the Portuguese, one-woman band, Surma. One can anticipate haunting vocals, shimmering guitars, experimental percussion and a downtempo vibe. Her vocals are reminiscent of Björk and Jana Hunter of Lower Dens. According to her label, Omnichord Records, her debut EP will be released in November 2016. In the meantime, check out the music video for “Maasai,” directed by Eduardo Brito.


Cadence Kid artist image
I believe in the ripple effect. Good deeds – however small – ripple outwards, spreading positivity in their wake. By sharing Cadence Kid’s lighthearted indie-pop summer jam, “Hold On Me,”  I hope to spread the song’s good vibes. Cadence Kid demonstrates compositional brilliance with “Hold On Me.” The song features tuneful melodies, beautiful pads and vocals, purposeful harmonies, and a sound song structure. With the right promotion, I expect “Hold


Dance music has, and always will be, inherently political. It’s something we sometimes forget in recent years with all of the cake throwing and pool partying, but it’s true. It’s political because dance music’s legacy came from a political place. It came from the black community, the queer community, the nerd community; dance music evolved from an otherized, underground hub of outsider culture before eventually becoming the mainstream behemoth it


London’s Mick James just released a fantastic chiller of a track, bringing his blend of UK garage and 2-step into the mix. “Shelter Me” is a remix of Sade’s “I Never Thought I’d See the Day,” which lends a silky smooth vocal and lush soundscape.  Mick James definitely preserved all of the best parts of the original and added in a beefed up bass line complete with diving sub hits. Embrace