Marie Davidson - Working Class Woman
In trying times, there is catharsis in existential horror. No album in 2018 comes close to being as suffocating and as bleakly humorous than Marie Davidson’s latest album Working Class Woman, released this month on Ninja Tune. Davidson’s bonafides are unquestioned: she has appeared on DFA, CitiTrax, and HOLODECK among other labels and her mastery of exquisite sound design are on full display on this album. Working Class Woman is


Ahead of Blisspop Disco Fest starting August 31st at the 9:30 Club and U Street Music Hall, Blisspop contributors Justin Barini-Rivers, Aeron Premo, and William Creason talk about some of their favorite Disco edits. First Choice – “Let No Man Put Asunder” (Shep Pettibone Remix) (1983) “Let No Man Put Asunder” first appeared in 1977 on First Choice’s Delusions album, but it’s the 1983 version by Shep Pettibone that propelled into club classic status.  Pettibone doubles


Ahead of Blisspop Disco Fest starting August 31st at the 9:30 Club and U Street Music Hall, Blisspop contributors Aeron Premo and William Creason talk about some of their favorite disco records.   Carol Douglas – “Doctor’s Orders” (1974) In order to re-record a hit UK single by an act called Sunny, RCA put together a crack team of session musicians for “Doctor’s Orders.”  Produced by future space disco originator Meco Monardo and


Amelie Lens
With a rigorous touring schedule that finds her flying from festival to festival and a growing catalog of highly stylized acidic techno stompers, Amelie Lens‘ profile has been growing at an exponential rate. With the arrival of INV 020, a new split 12″ with Regal on his Involve label, we hear Lens at the height of her production prowess with “Render”. Her sparse but spartan percussion whips around an acid


Catchdubs
Fool’s Gold Records co-founder Nick Catchdubs launches a new series of productions with “UFO Style”. Catchdini’s latest emerges from hazy intro with trunk rattling low bass end hits leading into the mangled earworm refrain “I’m higher than a UFO”. The track meshes a sun-drenched retro synth pad with slow motion club knocking percussion straight out of a Mustard beat, Drive meets “Burn Rubber.”