For better or worse, synthwave music catapulted into the pop culture limelight in 2016 thanks to the Netflix original series, Stranger Things. It’s safe to assert that artists such as Com Truise, Anoraak, and others are established staples in the electronic music scene that are crossing the threshold into massively popular electronic music. In light of this phenomenon, my guilty pleasure is listening to a newcomer on the synthwave scene known as Mono


Nothing amps my week more than to premiere THE WARHORSE’s glorious redux of the 2011 The Weeknd’s hit, “High for This.” For this Los Angeles based synthwave/electroclash band, it is nothing short of courageous to successfully make a banger rendition of one of the top pop songs of this decade. Their rendition sounds completely fresh and different from the original: wrangling in their influences of 80s party pop, thrashy garage


Grant Eadie, aka Manatee Commune, is a multi-instrumentalist and a one-man band extraordinaire, featured on the likes of KEXP and NPR’s All Songs Considered. His style emcompasses whimsical and pleasant, chill out electronic music that captivates audiences around the world. I had the chance to catch up with him before he commenced his “Sink or Swim” tour of the United States. His upcoming album, Manatee Commune, will be released on


Follow Your Stupid Heart Album Art
Blocktreat’s single, “Follow Your Stupid Heart,” is an experimental piece by Vancouver producer/artist Brandon Hoffman. One can anticipate layers of looped vocals, field recordings, and bluegrass music pulsing to a syncopated beat. The music video, directed by Sam Tudor, imparts a sense of wanderlust and daydreaming. The escaped fantasies depicted in the music video are triggered by unconventional syncopation. “Follow Your Stupid Heart” is from the recently released album, Exciting Adventures


Transport yourself to another world by listening to the premiere of Metropole Des Anges Pt. 1 by EH46, a musical group based in Southern California. Founded in 2009 by J. Schweitzer, their drone-based compositions use a variety of electric and acoustic instruments to explore the effects of melodic and harmonic structures on human emotional perception. Although there is a constant cycle of droning tones in this piece, it shifts between dissonance