Nunu
The French producer Nunu first came to my attention when his gleaming drum track “Blush” appeared on the stellar Top Billin Meets Classical Trax compilation released earlier this year. Additionally, a new track titled “Long” is out this Friday on the [Re]Sources Music label. Both tracks point in the direction of Nunu’s debut EP out July 1st on The Astral Plane. “Punani” from Nunu’s forthcoming Mind Body Dialogue ambles to

Rocco
The rotation of the earth lends itself too easily to metaphor, the binary of day and night serving as the foundation of a thousand myths. The sun makes life possible, and in opposition the night tells a different story. In 1977 Gary Gilmore was executed, the first case of capital punishment in the US in a decade. He didn’t hesitate, waiving all appeals and opposing those filed by other parties.

NAVVI - Omni LP on Hush Hush Records
Summer in Seattle is a magical time of year. The marine layer that hovers over the city gives way to the sun and the foliage catches the sunlight at an angle that radiates green in a color so vivid, it seems like it can only be found there. Seattle is home to NAVVI, the duo consisting of Kristin Henry & Brad Boettger, whose sound feels like the dying light of

Denite artist image
It starts with a heartbeat. Then two synthesizers and a percussive element come into the mix. Enter the vocals – you’re hooked. Denite’s song “Berlin” is a lesson in popular dance music composition. “Berlin” features ample melodic hooks, carefully considered harmonies, skillfully designed sounds, and memorable percussion rhythms. Denite has even managed to sing bleak lyrics over the distinctively upbeat instrumentals. “Berlin” has every qualification for what makes a song

A broken pitchfork
Pitchfork is a well-respected online music magazine. The publication was founded by Ryan Schreiber in 1995 and covers a swath of music. Yet even reputable sources of information can lack foresight. Pitchfork’s degrading reviews of Daft Punk’s Discovery in 2001 and Daft Club in 2004 are evidence that Pitchfork dropped their crystal ball, it shattered, and they lost much of their credibility as a tastemaker. Schreiber’s review of Discovery was well