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Anja Schneider, “Circle Culture”

Posted on July 14 2015 by Jason Otwell
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Mobilee label star, Anja Schneider, recently released her first EP of 2015, Culture Club, just a few days ago. Flying high on the successes of a packed 2014, Schneider’s latest three song EP shows that she has no intention of taking a break anytime soon. The opening track, “Circle Culture,” is a mesmerizing romp through a journey of expert breakdowns that begs to be experienced in a live setting. Going even deeper, “The Squaring” is a slow burning techno cut that builds over ten minutes of strained bliss. Capped off by a remix of “Circle Culture” by Konstantin Sibold and Leif Muller, Culture Club is a heavy dose of techno that furthers the notion that Anja Schneider is a force to be reckoned with.

Listen to an EP sampler below or download in full here.

 

The Spotlight: Sarah Myers

Posted on June 15 2015 by Patrick Blinkhorn
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This is ‘The Spotlight.’ Many artists pass through D.C. on a weekly basis, but this column highlights one specific artist who happens to be playing in the district during the week. That way, you may join their journey in influencing the house music landscape.

House and techno are a dominating force in today’s American music scene and Sarah Myers is a leader in DC. Rightfully labeled a “hometown hero,” I became acquainted with many different sides of Sarah over the course of our interview. Sarah and I talked about the Life parties she was involved with around town, what it’s like being a Flash resident and whether there’s a Flash-UHall rivalry, her favorite roast chicken recipe, advice she has for up-and-coming DJs, how she got to play Space Ibiza the same night as Carl Cox, and much, much more. Catch Sarah this Wednesday (June 17) at Flash Bar – she’ll be playing a four-hour set while John Digweed plays the main room upstairs.

You will find an abridged version of the transcribed interview below along with the audio from the interview and a sample of Sarah’s mixes:

SM: I grew up in the area – Severn, MD. Even though Severn is closer to Baltimore, I consider DC to be my home. I’ve been here for a while. I don’t know if you know this about me, but my friends and I started a party here.

PB: Yeah, Life – tell me a little bit about that.

SM: So my friends and I felt that there was a gap – there were a bunch artists who people wanted to see, but not a lot of promoters were booking them in DC. So we decided to throw a party and we booked artists from Matthew Dear – that was one of our first parties at this club called Muse, way back in 2009 – to Maya Jane Coles, Heidi, Francois K, Steve Bug, Josh Wink

PB: Wow, those are a lot of big names.

SM: Yeah, we brought a ton of artists. It was super fun, but one of our guys – Mike Fisher – moved to New York and I think our last party was Lee Burridge at UHall. It was so insanely hot – probably one of the hottest days of the year, just sweat everywhere … it was a great party. We just decided to take a break though and the break’s been about two years now. So yeah, that was super fun. I did some of the bookings, the social media, driving to pick up the DJs … but I have a full time job actually. I work as a systems engineer for a government agency – DJing is a more of a serious hobby.

I worked a while with Life as a promoter and DJing came to me spontaneously. Someone had turntables for sale on Craigslist and I thought “this is really good deal – I’m going to buy them.” I had no intention of playing out.

PB: What make and brand of turntables were they?

SM: A pair of 1200 Technics. I learned with Traktor and vinyl.

With the Life party, I realized that I had this great opportunity to open for DJs. I started DJing in 2011 and here I am now.

PB: It’s 2015 now and look at you now – you’re doing really well! You’re opening for big acts like Adriatique and you’re even going to New York to play Verboten shows. That’s really cool.

So at what age did you spark an interest for music and do you play any instruments?

SM: I’ve always been into music, but then again, have you ever met anyone who said “I’m not into music”?

PB: That’s true. Music is an essential art that ties us all together – there’s nothing quite like it.

SM: Exactly. But then again, I don’t understand how anyone could not be into food, but my dad isn’t – he doesn’t care, he’ll just eat anything. I’m a foodie – I love cooking.

PB: What’s your favorite dish to cook?

SM: I make a roast chicken that’s really good. The chef from French Laundry, Thomas Keller, has this great recipe that’s super simple – his restaurant is in Napa Valley. Everyone’s intimidated by making a roast chicken, but it’s the easiest thing to make. It takes five minutes and then you throw it in the oven for an hour at 450º F. You don’t even baste it – the key is you have to truss it really tight with string to keep all of the juices in. It’s super easy, I’ll send you the recipe. But back to the question – music.

I grew up listening to all kinds of music – classical, 90s hip hop, R&B. I don’t actually listen to a lot of house and techno in my spare time unless I’m preparing for a gig. I feel you have to take a break from it and get your inspiration from other kinds of music – it helps refresh your palate.

As far as instruments, I played violin when I was younger for a few years. But I don’t know how to read music because I took the Suzuki method. I played flute for a few months and I taught myself how to play guitar, but I don’t play any instruments right now. I think playing instruments helped, especially learning music by ear.

PB: I read in your Music is 4 Lovers interview that you’re dabbling in production – can you tell me about that.

SM: Yeah, it’s sort of slow going. Having a full time job and the DJ thing takes up a lot of my time … so yeah, I have a keyboard, an Ableton Push, and a Moog Minataur, but I’m not quite there yet – I’m still learning. I have Ableton Live 9. That’s my goal for the next year or so: to definitely get into the production side.

PB: How would you describe your sound, both production and DJ sets? Not just genre, but also vibes from your sound.

SM: When I first started DJing, people would say “it may take you a little bit to find your sound.” And I couldn’t really wrap my head around that. But everything really did fall into place. I’m drawn to the darker, deeper sounds, with rolling bass lines. A lot of artists like John Digweed – he’s my favorite.

PB: Some of Digweed’s Bedrock material or his newer music?

SM: Some of his older music. I love John’s music, but for me, I actually have to see him live – it’s an experience. His Global Underground 19: Los Angeles was really what drew my attention to him. The whole Lexicon Avenue, trippy, dark music – that’s what the real progressive came from.

PB: So your sound is deep and dark with rolling bass lines?

SM: Yeah, I think in another interview I described it as “dank nasty house,” haha. I don’t play too many vocals. I feel that with vocals, you have to use them sparingly – you have to make the audience want it. So when you do play them they’re like “oh, shit!”

PB: Who or what would you consider your greatest influences. This doesn’t have to be music – it could be works of art, books paintings, movies, or people.

SM: There’s an artist I really like named Stella Im Hultberg. Her pieces are very feminine and sensual.

PB:  Cool. What was the most moving piece of music you have ever heard and what about it moved you?

SM: Definitely the Burial album, Archangel. I had never heard anything like that before – it completely captivated me. It was just so emotive and haunting … it was so trippy. My favorite album for sure.

PB: What was your favorite track off of it?

SM: Archangel. There’s actually an edit by Saso Recyd. I feel like that with a lot of special pieces of music like that, there are some that you shouldn’t touch at all, but this guy really nailed it. Every time I play it, people are like “oh my gosh, this is crazy!”

I like Trentmøller. His essential mix from 2006 is one of favorite mixes of all time. It’s very eclectic. That’s definitely an inspiration for me.

I listen to a lot of 90s hip hop and RnB. That’s mostly what I listen to now. Artists like Erykah Badu, SWV, and Jodeci. I recently acquired my parents old vinyl collection so I’ve been playing a lot of Queen, Michael Jackson, Peter Frampton, etc. lately and I’ve been buying the vinyls that I used to have on cassette as a teenager like Smashing Pumpkins and Nirvana.

PB: Nice! Have you encountered any obstacles or challenges in becoming the artist you are today?

SM: It takes a lot of hard work. The technical aspect of DJing is actually not that difficult to learn. You have to be really passionate about it obviously. The hardest part is that you get bored quickly of your own music. Sometimes you feel that you don’t have a good barometer to tell you if other people are sick of certain tracks too. Because if you play it all the time, you think “oh man, is everyone in the audience sick of it too?” But generally they’re not. They’re not as big music nerds [as you].

I wouldn’t say that being a female DJ hasn’t hindered me at all. I’d say it’s helped me. It definitely opens a lot of doors. Its a double-edged sword though: people definitely judge you harder because they’re thinking “oh she’s a girl, but can she really play?” It’s kind of messed up, but that’s just how the world works. It’s definitely helped me. If you have the talent to back it up, then that speaks for itself. You just have to ignore all the other background noise.

PB: How has being a female DJ opened more doors for you?

SM: People have an interest in you being a female. There are just not that many around.

PB: Your podcast is called Hooked, right? Tell me a little bit about that.

SM: Yeah. So I’ve been doing that a little more than a year. I like to invite artists to give me guest mixes. I invite artists who I’m inspired by. I’ve had Mihai Popoviciu, Pornbugs, Bella Sarris, Randall M, Dubphone … I also like to feature local and up-and-coming artists that people may not have heard of yet.

PB: Nice. You’re a Flash resident, right? How has that been?

SM: I love playing at Flash. I’m very, very spoiled. The sound system is just crazy. It’s definitely a pleasure and an honor to be able to play there all the time.

PB: Do you think there’s a rivalry between Flash and Uhall seeing that they have two of the best sound systems in the city?

SM: No, not at all. They are cool with each other. For example, one time Flash needed a mixer in an emergency and Uhall lent it to them. Honestly it’s just good for the scene [to have them both around].

PB: And they both have their niches.

SM: Yeah, they have their different styles. It’s great for the city.

PB: What advice would you give to listeners just getting into house and techno? Who are some artists to watch right now? What venues should DC club-goers check out?

SM: Definitely Flash. Man, it’s like so difficult – there’s so much music out there. Hard question. My advice for up-and-coming DJs is to record everything you do and listen back to it immediately. I would definitely start on vinyl or CDJs – not Traktor. I started with Traktor and I felt that I became reliant on the visuals, so I switched to USBs so I could tune my ear. But yeah, I still try to record everything and I listen to it after gigs. I’ve heard Sasha still listens to his sets after every gig. You’ll remember what you were doing and thinking at the time that you made that specific mix. As for getting gigs, GO TO EVERY PARTY, GO TO EVERY AFTER PARTY! Always be prepared, always have a USB. I actually got to play at Space Ibiza. I lived in Ibiza two seasons ago. It was my Carl Cox’s closing party. My friend was DJing for his birthday in a side room and he was really drunk. I went up to my friend and told him “You’re doing great!” And he leans over and says “man, I wish someone would just take over right now.” It was like a movie. I said, “I have my USB,” and he said “alright, get up here.” And what was funny was that my roommate had gone to the bathroom and she would be like when she got back “what is Sarah doing up there?” I’ve heard that’s actually how Jamie Jones got noticed – he lived in Ibiza for a while and sometimes DJs wouldn’t show up and he would just go up there and play.

PB: Crazy story!

SM: So yeah, be prepared, go to every show – people aren’t going to book you if they don’t know who you are. So get to know everyone. If you want something, you’ve got to ask for it.

PB: Great advice. So who are some techno/deep house artists to watch?

SM: There’s this female producer from Ukraine, tish. I play a lot of her stuff. Mihai Popoviciu is one of my all time favorite producers. He’s from Romania and I actually just got to play with him at Flash. There’s this duo from Portugal, Fredy & D’Joseph, they’re always producing really cool stuff; Enzo Siragusa, Jamahr, and Samu.l. I love tINI, definitely one of my favorite DJs, and I love the stuff that BLOND:ISH has been playing lately. Martin Buttrich is an amazing producer. One of my favorite nights at Flash was when he played there.

PB: Finally, what mix of yours best represents the “Sarah Myers sound?” For people who haven’t seen you live, what gigs do you have lined up in the near future? What should we expect from you for the rest of 2015 (and in 2016)?

SM: I recently did a mix for Mihai’s label, Cyclic. It was just a one hour mix. Definitely one of my favorite mixes that I’ve done recently. I also just put out a yoga/meditation mix for the Forward Festival Infinity series – I feel like that kind of  re-energized me … it’s completely different from anything I’ve done. I layered in some binaural frequencies that are supposed to help open certain chakras, definitely one you need to listen to with headphones.

I’m playing a lot of rooftop parties in DC this summer. On Wednesday, June 17, I’m playing an extended set downstairs at the Flash Bar before John Digweed comes one. I’ve got some gigs in Orlando and Boston coming up. I’m going to dedicate myself to producing. I’m also going to work on my Hooked Podcast.

 

This concludes the Sarah Myers Spotlight interview. On behalf of Blisspop, I would like to extend a profound thank you to Sarah for agreeing to do this – you rock!

 

Too Funk Tuesday #15

Posted on May 26 2015 by Shawn G
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Oh heeeeey, welcome back to Too Funk Tuesday! Hope you had a great long weekend and are ready to continue the party with some awesome tracks this week. Below are some of the finest jamz aggregated by yours truly, enjoy!

Kartell — Addicted

Parisian producer Kartell is a man with no boundaries as he transcends deep house with a disco-infused chill wave vibe that shouts “SUMMER 2015!!” I’m hooked to this track, pun intended, and its easy to tell why. With energetic synth bars, sexually-charged vocals and one helluva bassline, this is one song to get your summer night boogie on to.

 

The Magician — Together

Ok..Ok..I know you’re thinking that I post about The Magician way too much, which is likely true BUT he has the midas touch when it comes to dance music. “Together” is a sure-fire dancefloor breaker with an epic breakdown that is mind-blowing. The whole track, from beginning to end, spews energy and upbeat vibes. A must listen!

 

Le Youth — Touch (JckLNDN Remix)

This is five minutes of pure bliss. Sensual, deep and laid back, this track can make you feel warm and fuzzy as you dance the night away. JckLNDN is definitely one to watch in 2015 and the future, as he continues to bring a unique sound to the indie/deep house scene…breaking ground on what “future house” can really look like. Not to mention his set at U Hall was unbelievable and I’m still highly impressed. This mix is vivid example why.

 

Motez — Tryna Shake It

If you’ve made this far into TFT, then I know you’re ready for some seriously off-the-wall funk.  If you’re a fan of Flash on Florida Ave, then this is the track for you as it could make that place explode. Australian sensation Motez brings one super freaky, experimental sound that has a sweet, soothing melody which is the seemingly destroyed by a deep, jaw-jarring breakdown that could rip the sub out of the woofer. Genius!

 

MIX OF THE WEEK — SNAKEHIPS on Diplo & Friends

If you’re a fan of hip hop meshed with dance music, then you’re set for the next hour with this mix. When done properly, this combination of genres can be utterly fantastic — a seeming cosmic clash of premiere production, Snakehips brings the heat for Diplo. Unfortunately, there is no tracklist but there were several “OMG” moments throughout this set that made it truly superb. Take the time and give it a go, it’ll surprise you how good this sounds.

The Spotlight: Nadastrom

Posted on May 21 2015 by zacheser
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This is ‘The Spotlight.’ Many artists pass through D.C. on a weekly basis, but this column highlights one specific artist who happens to be playing in the district during the week. That way, you may join their journey in influencing the house music landscape.

Moombahton is partially responsible for the resurgent, diverse dance music community we see today in Washington, D.C. and no act can lay stake to that claim as much as Nadastrom. The duo, comprised of DJs Dave Nada and Matt Nordstrom, has been on the forefront of the scene since its inception: at a party in 2009, Nada made the career defining choice to blend house and club tracks with dancehall. And while he wasn’t the first artist to manipulate club music with Latin and reggaeton influences, it didn’t take long for the mash of genres to spread throughout the underground community in Washington. Fast forward to 2015, Nadastrom is easily one of the biggest electronic acts to arise out of D.C. having played all over the world including dates at Electric Daisy Carnival, Fabric, and Electric Zoo as well as featured spots by the reigning Queen of BBC Radio One, Annie Mac.

 

The group, along with frequent collaborator Sabo, is also a driving force behind the Moombahton Massive parties thrown regularly at D.C.’s crown jewel of the underground dance movement, U Street Music Hall. These parties, which have also lead to the group’s involvement in curating stages for HARD, are notable for bringing in some of the hottest talent from all over the world – such as Toddla T and Munchi – as well as consistently being on the cutting edge of the subgenre often employing unique visuals and killer audio to complement the freshest sounds in the movement. These parties continue to sell out venues worldwide as well further proving that Nadastrom’s imprint on tropical bass is becoming deeper as time rolls forward.

But while they’re presence moombahton is still incredibly strong, their 2015 self-titled release on Friends of Friends sang a very different tune as it featuring soundscapes and character from a wholly different sonic catalog; an album which saw the duo experiment with what was already considered, by them, as an act of experimentation. This shift in direction marked a breakthrough for the group, and moombahton, as it allowed for a new ebb and flow showcasing a welcome branching out that connected the subgenre to many of the other molds featured in the canon of house music. In regards to their self-titled LP, Nada described it as a project where he and Nordstrom wanted “people to get lost in the tunes.”

Nadastrom’s mentality and overall approach as a group towards music has always been one about inclusivity and allowing the positive energy in a room to grow to its furthest, and most instinctual, potential; they have always seemed to find that balance between going full-on rager and blissed out commune which is not only a testament to their talent as tastemakers, but also as individuals who understand music is an experience which requires feeling. And as they begin to tread new ground as their sound evolves alongside the very subgenre they helped christen, the only thing we have left to say is, “Rock on.”

Nadastrom will perform an extended set alongside Ken Lazee at U Street Music Hall this Saturday for this month’s #BLISS party. For event information, visit the following link.

The Spotlight: Duke Dumont

Posted on April 21 2015 by zacheser
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This is ‘The Spotlight.’ Many artists pass through D.C. on a weekly basis, but this column highlights one specific artist who happens to be playing in the district during the week. That way, you may join their journey in influencing the house music landscape.

Duke Dumont‘s rise to fame over the past few years has been meteoric. Having gained a reputation for being a go-to, crowd pleasing DJ with ample respect for the roots of dance music – and often working with the clichés of those roots in his own works – he has become a household name in his native U.K. and is on the road to that same level of success here in the U.S.

Starting from humble beginnings under the tutelage of Switch, a producer known for working with a variety of artists including Santigold and M.I.A., Duke Dumont got his start remixing pop songs for various labels before eventually landing the EP Regality on Tiga‘s Turbo Recordings label. This would lead to two other EPs on this label, For Club Play Only Vol. I and For Club Play Only Vol. II, which got airplay from Annie Mac. These releases featured the singles “Street Walker” and “The Giver” respectively. His track “The Giver” would go on to become ubiquitous with the UK sound that would go on to define the current trends in dance music we’ve been hearing stateside for the past 18 months.

In early 2013, Duke Dumont released “Need U (100%)” featuring vocalist A.M.E. which received high praise and support from the Ministry of Sound, BBC Radio One, and artists such as Amtrac, Dave Edwards, and Disclosure. “Need U” would also lead to Duke Dumont’s first Grammy nomination. After this release, he quickly gained momentum on the international club and festival circuits in addition to being named a Future Star by dance music legend Pete Tong. 2013 also saw the creation of his label, Blasé Boys Club, which would go on to sign a deal with Virgin/EMI.

And then 2014 hit. Duke Dumont released “I Got U,” a colossal hit featuring Blasé Boys Club signee Jax Jones. “I Got U” would go on to earn him a second Grammy nomination, another chart topping hit in the UK and the US, and continued support from the biggest names in dance music becoming an anthem for the dance music festival circuit and the summer season in Ibiza. Last year also saw Duke Dumont on a sold out, headlining tour where he hit some of the world’s finest dance clubs including Washington, D.C.’s own U Street Music Hall. Later in the year he would release the equally monumental “Won’t Look Back,” which matched the success of his previous singles, as well as plans to perform as a live act (something which has already gone underway to rave reviews).

In 2015, Duke Dumont has plans to release his first full-length album and has already showcased a reprise of his now classic track “The Giver.” With a constant touring schedule and a relentless work ethic in the studio, he is easily one of the hardest working producers in the game today: a testament which clearly shows given the amount of success he’s had in such a short span of time. And he will continue to move forward at such a speed if he continues to deliver dynamic performances, authentic sounding tracks, and brilliant branding as a tour de force DJ to be reckoned with.

This week, he will be DJ’ing at the 9:30 Club with an opening act by Blisspop founder Will Eastman. You can find event details here.