We here at Blisspop have been able to secure some fantastic interviews over the course of our careers. But perhaps none stands as tall as the illustrious, mysterious figure of DJ BUTT. Little is publicly known about DJ BUTT and pleasant companion animal Ralph the Dog, but DJ BUTT’s music speaks for itself. Listen to the DJ BUTT EP (released on the 20th of this month) while you read this

People's Climate March Afterparty at U Street Music Hall April 29
Learn more about Bit Funk, Treasure Fingers, and Sammy Bananas before DJs for Climate Action Presents: the People’s Climate March afterparty on Saturday at U Street Music Hall. All door proceeds will benefit the People’s Climate Movement. RSVP on Facebook and purchase tickets. Growing up in a small town on Canada’s Atlantic Coast, Brooklyn-based Bit Funk has quickly earned a reputation as one of house and disco’s most respected artists. With breakout tracks like his

Kilter at U Street Music Hall April 26
Learn more about Kilter before his show tomorrow at U Street Music Hall. RSVP on Facebook and purchase tickets. Sydney, Australia-based Ned East produces a sunny, energetic mix of left-field hip-hop, tropical house, and indie electronic under the name Kilter. He first started making EDM mixes and edits while in high school, but he started taking production seriously when he received Ableton Live on his 18th birthday. At this point, he was producing

Matrixxman
Since 2013, the ROAM team has raised the bar for DC’s underground event circuit by bringing solid international headliners to unconventional spaces. Next month on May 20th, ROAM is headlined by the extraordinary techno producer Matrixxman. A favorite among the Blisspop writing team, Matrixxman has produced matte black cybernetic club tools for Spectral Sound, Delft, Unknown To The Unknown, and most recently Amsterdam powerhouse Dekmantel. Ahead of his appearance at

Kendrick Lamar’s new release DAMN. has been lighting up the airwaves and the Internet since its release last week. The record represents a departure from the jazzy, critic-friendly fare of TPAB in a few different ways, notably including the visual media accompanying the music. Kendrick Lamar’s video for “DNA” makes reference to a few standard rap video tropes – cops, girls, cars, gang affiliations. But instead of relying on these